Wordy/Wordless Wednesday: My Great, Great-Grandmother’s Appraisal

This probate court record appraised my great, great-grandmother, Tempy Burton and child at $1,600.

I’m not quite up to the task of expressing my thoughts upon seeing this document.  Nothing, not even seeing my great, great-grandmother bequeathed in a will drives home the true state of her situation as does this 1860 probate court appraisal of the “goods & chattels and personal estate of Judith B. Jones.”  Mrs. Jones was one of several family members that owned my great, great-grandmother, Tempy Burton.   The appraisers placed Tempy’s value and that of an infant child at $1,600.  She would have been about 40 years old when this document was written.

This document was so dispiriting that I considered not sharing it at all until I realized that the specifics included in it, like the names and ages of slaves, might prove useful to some other researcher.  So here they are (they’ll be familiar from the wills earlier posted in which my grandmother was bequeathed):

Tiller a woman, about forty-eight years of age, black….$450

William, a man, twenty-two years of age………………….$1,000

Reuben, man, aged 33 years of age…………………………..$1,400

Tom, a boy, 17 years of age, tall, well grown………………$1,600

Tempy, a woman & child, year old……………………………$1,600

Vincent, a man, 24 years of age……………………………….$1,700

Susan, woman, 23 years of age………………………………..$1,400

Offa, a boy, 11 yrs of age………………………………………….$1,100

Tanny, girl, 10 yrs of age……………………………………………$900
Thanks to historians Ray Bellande and Joel Brink for getting this document to me and to any other researcher whom may consider it useful.

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5 Comments

Filed under African-American history, ancestry, family history, geneology, Mississippi, race, slavery

5 responses to “Wordy/Wordless Wednesday: My Great, Great-Grandmother’s Appraisal

  1. Deb

    Oh, Dionne. I have a pit in my throat reading that. Like a piece of furniture. Hope you find comfort in knowing that the legacy she left is priceless.

  2. Just incredible. Thank you for sharing. I think it is very important. For many reasons.

    May you keep sharing your ancestor stories!

    Bill 😉

    http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/
    Author of “Back to the Homeplace”
    and “13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories”

  3. Patricia Armstrong Watkins

    It is always hard to, read something like this no matter how many times you encounter it. Nevertheless it is a great genealogical find.

  4. Thankfully she was only 5 years away from Freedom, and hopefully she survived and lived to breathe free air.

    It is upon her shoulder you now stand.

  5. Dionne,
    Although I haven’t any known ancestors in Mississippi, thanks for sharing with those who can benefit from the information.

    Kathleen

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